The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of physical activity per week, but only one in five adults and teens get enough to maintain good health.

Are you fitting in at least 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of heart-pumping physical activity per week? If not, you’re not alone. Only about one in five adults and teens get enough exercise to maintain good health. Being more active can help all people think, feel and sleep better and perform daily tasks more easily. And if you’re sedentary, sitting less is a great place to start.

These recommendations are based on the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition, published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and are based on current scientific evidence supporting the connections between physical activity, overall health and well-being, disease prevention and quality of life.

Recommendations for Adults

  • Get at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes per week of vigorous aerobic activity, or a combination of both, preferably spread throughout the week.
  • Add moderate- to high-intensity muscle-strengthening activity (such as resistance or weights) on at least 2 days per week.
  • Spend less time sitting. Even light-intensity activity can offset some of the risks of being sedentary.
  • Gain even more benefits by being active at least 300 minutes (5 hours) per week.
  • Increase amount and intensity gradually over time.

    How do you know if you are exercising at the right intensity?

    Physical activity is anything that moves your body and burns calories. This includes things like walking, climbing stairs and stretching….and Gyrotonic Exercise!!!

    Aerobic (or “cardio”) activity gets your heart rate up and benefits your heart by improving cardiorespiratory fitness. When done at moderate intensity, your heart will beat faster and you’ll breathe harder than normal, but you’ll still be able to talk. Think of it as a medium or moderate amount of effort.

     

    Know Your Numbers: Maximum and Target Heart Rate

    This table shows target heart rate zones for different ages. Your maximum heart rate is about 220 minus your age. Your target heart rate during moderate intensity activities is about 50-70% of maximum heart rate.

    The figures are averages, so use them as a general guide.

    Age Target HR Zone 50-85% Average Maximum Heart Rate, 100%
    20 years 100-170 beats per minute (bpm) 200 bpm
    30 years 95-162 bpm 190 bpm
    35 years 93-157 bpm 185 bpm
    40 years 90-153 bpm 180 bpm
    45 years 88-149 bpm 175 bpm
    50 years 85-145 bpm 170 bpm
    55 years 83-140 bpm 165 bpm
    60 years 80-136 bpm 160 bpm
    65 years 78-132 bpm 155 bpm
    70 years 75-128 bpm 150 bpm

     

    How to bring more cardio into your Gyrotonic Practice?

     

    To get started, you will want to know your target heart rate and become aware of it in your Gyrotonic Session. You can do this by wearing a fit bit or heart monitor or stopping for a moment and taking your pulse.  You want to be in the 50-70% range of your Target Heart Rate during at least 30 minutes of your session..or more!

    If you want to increase your heart rate, you can increase your rhythm, or the resistance on the equipment.   You can also focus on short bursts of more intense Gyrotonic Movement to bring up your heart rate as a kind of circuit training.

    Move your Body and Open Your Heart…One more point

    I want to point out one other way that Gyrotonic Movement can help your heart. Gyrotonic Movement not only moves the body, but moves it in a way that let’s you drop into your body, take a deep breath, open your heart and step into a powerful place of openness in your body and your mind.  And this may be one of the best results of all for your heart and mind!

    All the best!

    Dawn